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Joseph Zbukvic People at Work DVd available at the Artists Place

People at Work-Watercolours DVD with Joseph Zbukvic


 

$39.95

JZ-5DVD
+

Joseph is one of the leading watercolour painters of today, with his atmospheric paintings of rural life and strong urban scenes. Here he selects a range of subjects to illustrate working life.

Painting in and around Melbourne, he captures the noise and heat of a road gang at work on the street, grape pickers in a vineyard, figures working on a yacht in the dockyard and market stall holders on a busy morning.

Working in his studio, he gives a practical demonstration of how to capture movement in figures including a chef at work.

APV Films Runtime 110 minutes. This DVD is NTSC for the US, Canada, Japan and other countries needing this format.

 

ARTBOOKREVIEW.NET - November 2013
The first review I did of this was for a magazine and I was limited to 150 words. You have to be pithy in that length and the challenge now, when I can write as much as I like, is to capture the joyful simplicity of this delightful film while at the same time taking the opportunity to tell you a bit more about its content.

I was captivated in the first ten minutes. In that short time, Joseph demonstrates how to capture figures from stationary to full exertion in just a few brush strokes. He also shows the importance of structure and proportion – how the rest of the body is always seven and a half times the height of the head and how you should be able to achieve that without measuring. It just looks right. Change it and you either have a Martian or a child. It’s engaging as well as a forehead-slapping moment – “Of course!”

The body of the film is shot on location and Joseph paints and sketches a variety of figurative compositions – at a market, roadworks, a harbour and a café as well as grape-pickers in a vineyard. In the course of these, he explains how to identify your subject, then to assemble the figures that will go in it and, finally, to simplify. He also has valuable advice on the structure of the whole work – “Foreground takes you in, middle ground’s the stage with your figures and the background’s just a pattern. Don’t over-work it.”

The important thing throughout is that these are not portraits, they’re figures that are there to do (and are doing) a job and they need to fit, both in terms of action and proportion, into the scene as a whole.

It’s a hugely informative film, but done with such a light touch, both artistically and in terms of presentation, that you’ll hardly notice you’re learning.